Rwomushana: Museveni is epitome of rising insecurity

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Former intelligence operative Charles Rwomushana.

Former Internal Security Organisation [ISO] operative, Charles Rwomushana, believes President Museveni’s desire to stay in power is behind the increasing insecurity in the country.

While discussing the wave of insecurity in Uganda, Rwomushana told #NTVOnTheSpot host Patrick Kamara that it is not accidental that crime is on the rise.

“We are now in the post ‘Togikwatako’ era but we are not debating and agitating against MPs extending their term of office without going through an election.”

According to Rwomushana, the epitome of this is President Museveni saying that security is infiltrated which he disputes.

“I will not buy this. If you look at the way women were killed in Uganda, this can’t be normal crime, it is was organised and it went parallel with amending the constitution.”

Victoria University

He added: “How can the Inspector General of police [Kale Kayihura] order for the arrest of a self-confessed criminal and the next day he hears from the media that the criminal has been released? That is impossible, no one contradicts the power of the Inspector General in police.”

Rwomushana said the problem is much bigger but they always try to make it seem like it’s nothing because they want to calm people down.

He said opposition against president Museveni is insecurity. He recalled how Museveni appeared in Entebbe with a yellow book and interviewed women about the killings.

“After that scenario, the killings stopped. Which kind of magic is that?”

Rukungiri municipality MP Gerald Karuhanga who was appearing on the same show, said Ugandans have been believing that they are all safe but the unexplained cases of insecurity are increasing consistently especially if the government doesn’t come out to say anything leaves people imagining more.

“We spend so much taxes on security, the people of Uganda should be well assured about their security but it is not the case,” Karuhanga said.

He added: “I don’t think the intelligence sector has broken down so badly that it can’t find answers to what is going wrong in the country.”

Dr. Tolit Atiya, a security analyst, says the insecurity happening right now in Uganda involves all Ugandans and therefore answers must be found.

“This is the time when conceptually we need to rethink our security. We need to ask ourselves whether what we are facing in Kampala is state driven or an element of influencers from the international environment.”

He added: “As a Country, we need to collect ourselves and ask the most pertinent questions. What are the drivers and why now?”

Fred Egesa, a private investigator, revealed that people in the villages are crying that policemen are molesting people.

“But why should we have this kind of situation? It is because policemen know they are not monitored,” he wondered.

According to Egesa, criminals are everywhere but intelligence is capable of digging in and finding solution.

“The problem is that our Uganda has failed to find solution because our intelligence has failed to design one.”

He went on: “Once you don’t set up a situation for people to know that they can be found out in whatever they do then you lay a very good bed for criminals.”

Egesa asked police to act professionally and not just send boys without uniform to grab or cut peoples’ doors by doing that they are militarising the public.

“The Inspector General of Police should open his ears and listen to the cries of the people.”

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