NRM youth raise banners for Muhoozi to be president

0
337
One of the posters

A group of youth belonging to the ruling National Resistance Movement [NRM] have printed banners and posters showing their support of first son as the next president of Uganda.

The youth who have been running a social media platform called “MK-Generation”, claiming the young people want Maj Gen Muhoozi Kainerugaba to succeed his father as the leader of Uganda come 2021 general elections.

According to the poster, the group passes Muhoozi as “our generation president 2021-2026], onwards”.

The development comes at a time when the ruling party is fight tooth and nail to remove the presidential age limit clause from the constitution so President Museveni can rule until death.

In July this year, Senior Presidential Advisor on the media and public relations, John Nagenda, said Muhoozi will never make a proper president.

Nagenda said he is worried about what comes next when Museveni leaves power.

“I get nightmares thinking that by bad luck, there is no heir to Museveni in place. What happens if Museveni dies as all human beings do? If he dies, I fear that we will spend the next few years with people fighting for the presidency,” he mused.

The youth who want Muhoozi as president

According to Nagenda who has advised Museveni for over 20 years, the country should have prepared an heir to take up the reins of government when Museveni is no more.

“Muhoozi is a soldier, polite young man. I like know him. I like him as I like his father by the way but he is not a proper president.”

Nagenda’s fears came after senior army officer, Brig. Kasirye Ggwanga, said Museveni will bring his son to succeed him.

“Do you expect him to bring you instead of his son? All you can do is get some to stand against him in elections,” Kasirye said.

Democratic Party President General, Norbert Mao, also expressed displeasure with the kind of marathon employed by Museveni while giving Muhoozi new ranks to the current rank of Major General.

In 2013, the controversial army general warned Museveni against the idea of his son, succeeding him as president, saying such a move would be met with stiff resistance from the military.

Observers suggest that, by appointing Muhoozi as a presidential adviser, Museveni sought to give his son some political experience.

“Muhoozi is now high ranking than many soldiers who fought in Luweero Triangle,” Mao said, referring to the galloping through the ranks by the president’s son.

In August, former Soroti Municipality legislator, Mike Mukula, said he has a lot of hope in Muhoozi as a future leader of Uganda.

Museveni has on several occasions denied hatching such a plot which was first publicised by Gen David Sejusa in the 2013 so-called “Muhoozi project”.

According to Mukula, even if he doesn’t hold power, Muhoozi has the potential to change the destiny of Uganda and turn it into a modern state.

“I have alot of hope in Muhoozi (President’s son),” Mukula said over the weekend, adding, “Even if he is not in power, he will do a lot of change.”

Mukula said the ruling party was determined to groom young leaders who will take over power citing the case of first son-in-law, Odrek Rwabwogo, who challenged NRM historical, Matayo Kyaligonza, for western region chairmanship.

He cited other cases of NRM secretary general, Kasule Lumumba, her deputy Richard Todwong and Treasurer, Rose Namayaja as well as her deputy Kenneth Omona.