Obama breaks record with most liked anti-racism tweet in Twitter history

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Former US President Obama

Unlike some former presidents, Barack Obama is showing no signs of completely abandoning public life.

Since leaving office, Obama has commented on major events or controversies, including the terrorist attack in Manchester, England, and Sen. John McCain’s brain cancer diagnosis. He did so again on Saturday, after the deadly violence in Charlottesville.

“No one is born hating another person because of the colour of his skin or his background or his religion … People must learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love … For love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite,” Obama said, quoting former South African president Nelson Mandela in tweets.

The first tweet, which shows a picture of Obama smiling at four children, has been retweeted more than 1.1 million times and liked 2.723 million times as of Tuesday evening.

The message became the most liked tweet of all time, surpassing Ariana Grande’s response to the deadly terrorist attack after her concert in Manchester. It also ranks No. 7 among the most retweeted tweets according to Favstar, a tweet tracking site.

Obama has used Twitter only sporadically since January, tweeting a handful of times every month to weigh in on national conversations. It’s unclear if Obama himself or a social media team is handling his Twitter handle.

President Trump’s response to the violence in Charlottesville has become the subject of widespread criticisms.

In a statement Saturday, he condemned hatred and bigotry from “many sides,” not saying which “sides” he was referring to, or whose hatred and bigotry he was condemning.

Many Democrats and some Republicans took issue with Trump for not calling out white nationalists or white supremacists, even after a car, allegedly driven by a neo-Nazi sympathizer, ploughed into a crowd of counter protesters, killing a 32-year-old woman and injuring 19 others.

On Monday, after two days of criticisms, Trump finally explicitly condemned hate groups, “including the KKK, neo-Nazis, white supremacists.”

Using dozens of clips from President Trump’s speeches, The Post Editorial Board reimagines his disastrous Aug. 12 address.

But on Tuesday, Trump defended his earlier statement in a highly combative news conference.

“Before I make a statement, I like to know the facts,” Trump told reporters, also reiterating his belief that both sides are to blame for the violence.

Obama did not comment on the White House’s statements on Charlottesville and has largely avoided criticizing his successor.

 

Source: Washington Post

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